Rupert Wace Ancient Art

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Egyptian

  - Egyptian granite left hand and wrist

Egyptian granite left hand and wrist

New Kingdom.18th Dynasty, reign of Amenhotep III, 1391-1353 BC

Provenance:
with Galerie Ratton-Ladriere, Paris; Property of a Private Foundation

Literature:
For an example of the type of statue to which these hands may have belonged, see the granodiorite statue of Sekhmet in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York (acc. no. 15.8.3), and a seated limestone statue of Amun-Ra in the Egyptian Museum, Turin (inv. no. 768).

Description:
From an over-lifesized statue, probably of a seated pharaoh or god, the hand, clasping an ankh-cross, would have rested on the figure's knee. The fragment broken at the wrist above a banded cuff, and below the hoop of the ankh.

Length: 33.7 cm

  - Egyptian woven basket containing three desiccated fruits of the Dom palm

Egyptian woven basket containing three desiccated fruits of the Dom palm

New Kingdom. 18th-20th Dynasty, 1540-1069 BC

Provenance:
Gatineau collection, France, acquired prior 1903; with Charles Ede, London, 2004; with Rupert Wace Ancient Art, London, 2008; Property of a Private Foundation

Literature:
Another basket of fruits found in a tomb-chapel in the Theban Necropolis commemorating Nebamun (c. 1350 BC), a middle-ranking official scribe and grain counter is now in the collection of the British Museum (acc. no. EA5395). See also S. Schoske, B. Kreissl, R. Germer, 'Anch, Blumen für das Leben: Pflanzen im alten Ägypten', Munich, 1992, p. 235, no. 167. On the use of dom-palm fruit in pharaonic Egypt, see M. A. Murray, 'Fruits, Vegetables, Pulses and Condiments' in P. T. Nicholson and I. Shaw, 'Ancient Egyptian Materials and Technology', Cambridge, 2000, pp. 620-621.

Description:
The elliptical basket is constructed of coiled palm fibres woven together with a decorative striped pattern, and contains three desiccated dom palm fruits.

Baskets filled with the preserved fruit of the dom palm have been recovered from a number of different sites in Egypt, including eight discovered in the tomb of Tutankhamun.

The Egyptians often used the fruit to spice their cakes, giving them a gingerbread flavour.

Length: 29.2 cm; width: 17.5 cm

  - Egyptian bronze oxyrinchus

Egyptian bronze oxyrinchus

Late Dynastic Period. 25th-31st Dynasty, 715-332 BC

Provenance:
Private collection France, acquired in the 1970s

Literature:

Description:
The fish, with its distinctive long, down-turned snout, is crowned with uraei, cow's horns and sun disc with double suspension loop behind. It wears a broad beaded collar around its gills and has hollow eyes recessed for inlay (now missing). It is perched on a sled, supported by its tail, rear fin and a striated prop below its belly.

Length: 11.6 cm

  - Egyptian alabaster cosmetic vessel with lid

Egyptian alabaster cosmetic vessel with lid

Middle Kingdom. 11th-12th Dynasty, 2040-1801 BC

Provenance:
Knoop collection, USA, probably acquired 1950s.
Bill and Jeanne Knoop married in 1946 and started collecting in 1948. They were avid and eclectic collectors, their passions and focus changing over the years, encompassing at various times Pilgrim furniture, early lighting, inlaid boxes, treen, ivory miniatures, needleworks, nautical and whaling artifacts from New England. Their earliest collection, however, was of Egyptian artefacts, an area of interest which was sparked by a visit in the late 1940s to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Jeanne subsequently took advice from curators regarding reputable dealers.

Literature:

Description:
The squat body flares from a low angled foot to broad shoulders with thick integral circular rim. The original flat disc lid with circular projection on the underside to locate on the vessel and seal. The interior with traces of kohl.

Height: 4 cm Diameter of lid: 3.8 cm

  - Egyptian black-top jar

Egyptian black-top jar

Predynastic Period. Naqada I-II, c. 4000-3250 BC

Provenance:
Private collection UK, acquired at Christies London between 1956 and 1960

Literature:

Description:
Height: 30 cm

The elongated ovoid body rises from a small flat foot to a short neck with everted lip. The red and burnt black surface is burnished to a dull sheen.
The vessel restored from original fragments.

This comes with a thermoluminescence test report from Oxford Authentication confirming its antiquity.

Black-topped pottery vessels, made of fired Nile silt, have a polished red coloured lower surface, sometimes enhanced by a red slip. Below the rim is a blackened area probably caused by the vessel being fired with its mouth pushed into the ashes with the body exposed to the air, although it is also suggested that it was placed in some type of organic matter immediately after firing. This carbonization was employed solely to obtain a desired colour effect, and was obviously deliberate for the even firing of pottery in a kiln had been practiced for centuries. The blackened area is also polished, giving it an almost metallic sheen.

Exhibited: 'The Middle Class go To Heaven', Condo 2017, Galerie Max Mayer & CHEWDAY’S
Egyptian Funerary Objects, Jef Geys and Nicolás Guagnini, 14 January 2017 – 11 February, 2017

  - Egyptian predynastic painted pottery jar

Egyptian predynastic painted pottery jar

Naqada II, Gerzean, 3700-3250 BC

Provenance:
Collection of Ernest Seymour Thomas (d.1936), UK, acquired in the early 20th Century and thence by descent.
The ethnographer and artist, Ernest Seymour Thomas worked in Cairo for the Royal Geographical Society, writing a catalogue of the Ethnographical collections, which was published in 1924. He went on to be appointed assistant curator to the Pitt Rivers Museum by Henry Balfour in the early 1920s.

Literature:

Description:
Height: 10 cm Width: 14.5 cm

The jar of compressed globular form with lug handles and a flat everted rim. The body decorated in red slip with six vertical hatched panels, similar horizontal bands below the handles which also bear hatching. The base painted with concentric rings and the rim with six groups of six straight lines.

This comes with a thermoluminescence test report from Oxford Authentication confirming its antiquity.

  - Egyptian bronze statuette of Khonsu

Egyptian bronze statuette of Khonsu

Late Dynastic Period. 25th-31st Dynasty, 715-332 BC

Provenance:
Private collection France, acquired 1970s

Literature:

Description:
Height: 15.5 cm

Shown mummiform, holding both the djed-sceptre of Ptah, and the hook and flail of Osiris to his chest, his right hand placed above his left, wearing a false beard, sidelock, and broad usekh collar with tasselled trim and striated menat hanging at the back of the neck, his forehead crowned with a uraeus cobra, his head surmounted with a crescent and lunar disc.

This fine bronze combines the attributes of four separate Egyptian deities: Khonsu, Ptah, Osiris, and Iah. This is typical of representations of Khonsu from Lower Egypt, as is the placement of the hands, and conveys different aspects of his divinity. For example, the lunar disc points to his role as god of the moon and defender of those who travel at night, aligning him with Thoth and Iah: as Khonsupakhered, he was the personification of the light of the crescent moon, and thus of rebirth and regeneration. The child's sidelock, associated with Harpocrates, refers to his status at Thebes, where he was venerated with the name Khonsou-Neferhotep as the child of Amun and Mut; he also shared an epithet with Ptah, 'lord of Ma'at', and in the later period was associated with Osiris as respective personifications of the sun and moon.

Condition:
Repaired break at waist. Dark green patina over all.

  - Egyptian polychrome wood mask

Egyptian polychrome wood mask

Third Intermediate Period
22nd-24th Dynasty, 945-715 BC

Provenance:
From the Estate of Thomas M. Messer (1920-2013), New York, director of the Guggenheim Museum from 1962 to 1988

Literature:

Description:
The oval face with finely outlined, slightly smiling lips, straight nose, defined philtrum and large slightly recessed almond-shaped eyes. The upper rims, extended brows and cosmetic lines of the eyes carved in shallow relief. Crowned by the remaining central portion of the wig. Evidence of gilding survives on the face and with remains of original pigment on the wig and eyes.
Height: 24.1 cm

  - Egyptian schist rhomboidal palette

Egyptian schist rhomboidal palette

Predynastic Period. Naqada I-II,4200-3250 BC

Provenance:
Joseph Klein Collection, USA acquired between 1941 and 1980 and thence by descent

Literature:

Description:
Large broad example of roughly rhomboidal form with slightly convex profile. The face dished from use. Score marks on the surface particularly of the back from original finishing process.

Bearing old collection number in white 'No.171-4'.

Length: 37.5 cm

  - Egyptian faience frog seal amulet

Egyptian faience frog seal amulet

New Kingdom. 18th Dynasty, Thutmosid period 1504-1391 BC

Provenance:

Literature:
Examples of frog amulets can be seen in Florence Dunn Friedman (Ed.) with Georgina Borromeo, 'Gifts of the Nile, Ancient Egyptian Faience' (London, 1998) pp.116 and 208, figs. 70-71.

Description:
Of very pale green colour, the frog is depicted seated on an integral oval base, hind legs tightly bent, front legs splayed to support the erect upper body. Head held high with protruding eyes of round flattened rim with bulbous pupils, the mouth an incised line. Pierced longitudinally between the front and back legs to allow the amulet to be suspended or attached. Front of base restored.

The base of the amulet incised with a horse and eye hierolgyph within an oval frame. The horse first appears in Egypt during the Hyksos Period, the first foreign rulers in the country whose arrival initiated the Second Intermediate Period. The horse is probably still rare and a royal perogative during the early New Kingdom. It has been suggested that the representation of a horse on a seal amulet is a substitute for the king.

For the Egyptians the frog or toad held the same symbolism as the scarab beetle because it was apparently born from mud as though by spontaneous generation and, in addition, reproduced in huge numbers. Consequently, from the earliest Dynasties, an amulet in its shape offered its owner the hope of regeneration and fertility. Appropriately they were also associated with Heket, the goddess of childbirth.

Length: 2.5 cm