Rupert Wace Ancient Art

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  - Etruscan polychrome terracotta cinerary urn lid with reclining figure

Etruscan polychrome terracotta cinerary urn lid with reclining figure

3rd century BC

Provenance:
Private collection USA, acquired 1890-1900 and thence by descent

Literature:

Description:
The reclining man holds a patera with omphalos in his right hand. He rests on his left arm, propped up on a cushion, a large ring on his third finger. He wears a long white tunic, his himation draped loosely over his left arm. The deceased looks out at the viewer, the head well modelled with characterful face, ears protruding behind sideburns.
Much original polychrome surviving including the flesh tones and red and white stripes on the cushion and couch.

This piece comes with a thermoluminescence test report confirming its antiquity.

Dimensions: 24.1 x 44.5 x 23.5 cm

  - Apulian tall red-figure amphora

Apulian tall red-figure amphora

Magna-Graecia. c.330-310 BC

Provenance:
Private collection Switzerland, acquired before 1970

Literature:

Description:
Of Panathenaic form, side A showing two figures flanking a stele, the female figure seated on the right holding a patera, a standing male on the left. Side B shows a standing naked male holding a patera in his left hand, with a himation draped over his arm, and holding a foliate staff in his right hand.
This piece comes with a thermoluminescence test report from Oxford Authentication confirming its antiquity.

Height: 43.8 cm

  - South Arabian alabaster head of a woman

South Arabian alabaster head of a woman

c. 1st Century BC - 1st century AD

Provenance:
From the Collection of the late Ralph Hinshelwood Daly OBE (1924-2006), acquired prior to 1967.
In 1955 Daly joined the Colonial Service and was posted to the Aden Protectorates that today form the Republic of Yemen. It was here that he met and married his wife Elizabeth Anne Daly (née Fenton Wells) and acquired the collection of alabaster sculptures. In 1967 the Aden Protectorates became independent from Britain, and Ralph, awarded an OBE for his work, retired from the Colonial Service and returned with Elizabeth to Europe, taking their collection of alabasters with them.

Literature:
For a similar example, nicknamed 'Miriam' by the workman at the time of discovery, see St. J. Simpson (ed.), 'Queen of Sheba, Treasures of Ancient Yemen', London, 2002, pp. 194-195, no. 270. This head retains the plaster hair.

Description:
Height: 29.6 cm (inc. base)

The head with long tapering neck and shield shaped face. Thin arching brows above almond-shaped eyes inlaid with white stone, the pupils originally of glass or lapis (mostly missing). Her long straight nose above a narrow mouth. Her roughly chiselled hair seemingly tucked behind small, protruding ears. This rough finish to the hair and top of the head may have allowed the figure to be finished with the addition of plaster or stucco. The alabaster base, if not original, is certainly ancient. The stepped form is more usually associated with altars but it may have been reused.

This form of head is associated with the kingdom of Qataban which, together with Ma’in, Saba, Himyar, and Hadhramaut, was one of the five kingdoms of southern Arabia. Pliny the Elder recorded that Timna, the capital of this ancient kingdom was a busy metropolis housing no less than 65 temple complexes. Its wealth was based on its monopoly of the ancient cinnamon and incense trade routes. The area was first excavated in the 1950s by the American archaeologist Wendell Phillips, (W. Phillips, 'Qataban and Sheba: Exploring the ancient kingdoms on the Biblical spice routes of Arabia', London, 1955).

  - Egyptian bronze bolti fish

Egyptian bronze bolti fish

Late Dynastic Period. 26th-31st Dynasty, 664-332 BC

Provenance:
The Kevorkian Foundation, USA prior to 1970; Collection of Molly and Leon Lyon, USA acquired 1970s and thence by descent

Literature:
A similar example from Berlin is illustrated in G. Roeder, 'Mitteilungen aus der Ägyptischen Sammlung. Band VI. Ägyptische Bronzefiguren' (Berlin, 1956), pl.58, no. 8306. A mounted pair showing possible base type is reproduced in plate 61. Another very similar example is included in Hermann Schloegl, 'Geschenk des Nils, Ägyptische Kunstwerk aus Schweizer Besitz', Basel, 1978, no. 335 and lso Sue D'Auria, Peter Lacovara and Catherine Roehrig, 'Mummies & Magic - The Funerary Arts of Ancient Egypt', Boston, 1988, no.208.

Description:
The fish modelled in the round, details of scales, fins, eyes, nose and mouth incised. A tang for attachment below the belly.

The Bolti fish, or tilapia nilotica, was an important food source for the Egyptians and cosmetic vessels and lamps in the form of this freshwater fish can be found from many different periods. This statuette, however, was intended as a votive and would probably have been mounted on a bronze base possibly in the form of a sarcophagus.

Condition: Extreme tips of tail and dorsal fin broken.

Length: 9.3 cm

  - Egyptian faience ushabti of Hekaemsaf

Egyptian faience ushabti of Hekaemsaf

Late Dynastic Period. 26th Dynasty, reign of Amasis, 570-526 BC

Provenance:
Private Collection UK and thence by descent; Private collection, London, acquired 2003

Literature:
For other examples of Hekaemsaf ushabtis see Phillipp von Zabern, 'Égypte Moments d'éternité'. Catalogue to the exhibition of Egyptian art in Swiss private collections at the Musée Rath, Geneva, 25 September 1997-11 January 1998. Fig. 161B, p 246. Also Jacques-F Aubert & Liliane Aubert, 'Statuettes égyptienne, Chaouabtis, Ouchebtis', Librairie d'amerique et d'orient, Paris, 1974.

Description:
Faience ushabti with a blue-green glaze, for Hekaemsaf, Admiral of the Fleet, the head and face precisely rendered, the ears and mouth and cosmetic lines finely detailed, wearing striated tripartite wig, braided beard and carrying the flail and hoe, seed bag incised, the dorsal column projects slightly from the back below the bottom of the wig, inscribed with an abridged version of the sixth chapter of the Book of the Dead, the subtle modelling around the knees gives a strong sense of a body beneath the wrappings.

The tomb of Hekaemsaf was discovered in 1903 at Saqqara, and 401 ushabtis were recovered in a wooden chest. Most are now in museums.

Height: 17.9 cm

  - Egyptian predynastic black-topped jar

Egyptian predynastic black-topped jar

Naqada II, 3700-3250 BC

Provenance:
Private collection London, and thence by descent

Literature:
See Sir W. M. Flinders Petrie, 'Prehistoric Egypt, Corpus of Prehistoric Pottery and Palettes' (reprinted Warminster, 1974) plate IV, 27c. for the type.

Description:
Of flaring cylindrical form, small flat base and slightly everted rim.

Black-topped pottery vessels, made of fired Nile silt, have a polished red coloured lower surface, sometimes enhanced by a red slip. Below the rim is a blackened area probably caused by the vessel being fired with its mouth pushed into the ashes with the body exposed to the air, although it is also suggested that it was placed in some type of organic matter immediately after firing. This carbonization was employed solely to obtain a desired colour effect, and was obviously deliberate for the even firing of pottery in a kiln had been practiced for centuries. The blackened area is also polished, giving it an almost metallic sheen.

Condition: Recomposed from original fragments.

Height: 15.4 cm

  - Egyptian serpentine bust of an official

Egyptian serpentine bust of an official

Middle Kingdom. Late 13th Dynasty, c. 1750 BC

Provenance:
Sold Christie's, London 11 April 1972, lot 170 (miscatalogued as Old Kingdom); Private collection (A.O.)Switzerland

Literature:

Description:
The male figure is shown wearing a short bag wig with low crown, decorated with incised chequerboard-like patterning. His round face has long eyes with pronounced raised rims, a slight smile playing over his lips. A wide neck leads to broad shoulders the top of a garment visible. The torso broken at the waist.

The overall style of this figure, particularly the wig type, suggests a late 13th Dynasty date.

Height: 6.8 cm

  - Egyptian necklace of lapis lazuli heart amulets

Egyptian necklace of lapis lazuli heart amulets

Late Dynastic Period. 26th-30th Dynasty, 664-343 BC

Provenance:
Private collection Belgium, acquired 1970s

Literature:

Description:
Height: 2 cm each heart
Length as strung: 43 cm

Comprising 5 small heart-shaped 'ib' amulets carved from lapis lazuli, each in the form of an ovoid vessel with flat-topped rim surmounted by a ribbed suspension loop and with two lug-like projections. Strung with fine blue glass hoop spacer beads interspersed with groups of three similar yellow beads.

For the ancient Egyptians the heart was the most important of the body’s organs, they saw it as the seat of intelligence, the originator of all feelings and actions and the storehouse of memory.

Restrung and with modern clasp.

  - Romano-Egyptian alabaster alabastron

Romano-Egyptian alabaster alabastron

1st century BC- 1st century AD

Provenance:
Private collection UK

Literature:

Description:
A slightly flared neck and wide convex lip surmount the tapering, round bottom body. Two wheel-cut grooves decorate the shoulder and neck, and Greek graffiti is scored on the shoulder.

Height: 20.5 cm

  - Roman gold and onyx intaglio ring

Roman gold and onyx intaglio ring

c. 2nd - 3rd century AD

Provenance:
Private collection France, (CR) acquired 1980s

Literature:

Description:
Ring size: H
Length of intaglio: 1.5 cm

The flat topped, oval intaglio with brown and white banding, set in its original gold ring, the rounded shank flaring out at the shoulders. The parallel banding of onyx, a variety of chalcedony, lends itself to such decorative use and was very popular with the Romans. Here the effect produced is reminiscent of an eye, a protective symbol.

  - Romano-British domed bronze disc brooch

Romano-British domed bronze disc brooch

1st century AD

Provenance:
Reputedly found at Bradford-on-Avon, Wiltshire. Private collection UK

Literature:
See R. Hattatt, 'Ancient and Romano-British Brooches' (Dorset, 1982) p. 141, fig. 59, no. 128 for a similar example.

Description:
Romano-British disc brooch of rounded convex form. The dome decorated in a sunburst pattern of red and yellow enamel, a deep channel running inside the outer edge, a chain loop at one end with three additional knobs.
This type is common to Britain and found in a number of Roman sites dateable from the Flavian period to mid 2nd century AD. The sunburst pattern is imported with the rays reduced to a geometric design of triangles.

Diameter: 3.5 cm

  - Byzantine gold and garnet ring

Byzantine gold and garnet ring

4th-6th century AD

Provenance:
Sold Gorny & Mosch, Auction 150, 11 July 2006, lot 188; Property of a Private Foundation

Literature:
For discussion of the type and parallels, see J. Spier, Byzantium and the West: Jewelry in the First Millennium, London, 2012, pp. 62-65.

Description:
The flat gold band decorated with six cabuchon garnets, each within a circular gold cell.

The fashion for setting gems in cells like this begins in the third century AD and becomes increasingly popular until the sixth or seventh century. Several examples of this type are known, set either with garnets or with emeralds.

Diameter of band: 2 cm. Ring size: N

  - Cycladic marble head, attributed to the Naxos Museum Sculptor

Cycladic marble head, attributed to the Naxos Museum Sculptor

Late Spedos type, c.2500-2400 BC

Provenance:
Private collection Switzerland, acquired 1960s and thence by descent

Literature:
The Naxos Museum Sculptor had an unusual and easily recognised style. His works are discussed in Pat Getz-Gentle, 'Personal Styles in Early Cycladic Sculpture', Madison, Wisconsin, 2001, pp.81-3, with comparable examples included in plates 69 and 70.

Description:
Elongated shield-shaped face with long triangular nose (now lost) and rounded crown, chin and lower cheeks. Broken at the long neck from a large standing figure (estimated original length 55-60 cm or more).

A recent study of the sanctuary at Keros by Professor Colin Renfrew has suggested that dates be revised back about a century. Late Spedos examples such as this head would, therefore, be dated to around 2600-2500 BC (http://antiquity.ac.uk/ant/086/ant0860144.htm).

Height: 13 cm

  - Greek ‘Phi’ figure

Greek ‘Phi’ figure

Mycenaean. c. 1400-1300 BC

Provenance:
Private collection UK, acquired Sotheby's, London, 6th December 1971, lot 111

Literature:
Published: 'Eternal Woman-The Female Form in Antiquity', Rupert Wace Ancient Art, 2005, no. 35.

Description:
Of columnar form, the figure stands with her hands resting on her hips wearing a long dress flaring at the feet, the skirt painted with brown vertical stripes running from an encircling belt, whilst vertical serpentine lines decorate the flat body. A narrow band of paint outlines the thin edge of the arms. The flat body has two applied hemispherical breasts and the rounded shoulders rise to a small head with beaked nose. A line of paint runs down the nose and simple dots indicate the eyes.
Starting in the late fifteenth century BC and increasing during the following century Mycenaean terracotta figurines are found in both tombs and settlements. The female figures are grouped into two types called 'Psi' and 'Phi' because in outline they resemble these Greek letters. Modelled by hand and finished in the round, with painted decoration to the back as well as the front, their small size probably indicates that they had an amuletic purpose.

Height: 10.8 cm

  - Anatolian carnelian ram or goat's head amulet

Anatolian carnelian ram or goat's head amulet

Early 3rd millennium BC

Provenance:
Trampitsch collection, Paris

Literature:

Description:
Width: 4.8 cm

The pendant carved from an attractive translucent pink stone, possibly carnelian, in the form of a stylised head of a ram or goat. The triangular head with domed forehead, nostrils and almond shaped eyes incised. The curved horns extend horizontally, the fronts with etched lines to indicate tight spiralling. The back of the head hollowed with vertical hole at the top between the horns to allow for suspension.

  - Egyptian gold and carnelian swivel ring

Egyptian gold and carnelian swivel ring

New Kingdom. 18th Dynasty, 1540-1295 BC

Provenance:
Scholz Collection, Hamburg, Germany, acquired in the 1930s, then acquired by a Brighton collector on the London Art Market, 1980s, and thence by descent

Literature:
A New Kingdom swivel ring in Leiden demonstrates the same construction; cf. M. Bulsink, 'Egyptian Gold Jewellery', Turnhout, 2015, p. 157, no. 91. And for a comparable carnelian wedjat eye amulet, see Boston, Museum of Fine Arts, acc. no. 28.1373.

Description:
Consisting of a U-shaped shank and an amulet in the form of an udjat eye. The shank is made of a length-wise rolled up strip of gold foil, which is rolled tighter towards the ends to form two thin wires. These are threaded through the amulet and wound round around the shoulders of the shank.

Condition:
Intact. Small chip to top left corner of amulet on obverse.

Ring size M; amulet length: 1.4 cm

  - Phoenician glass head bead

Phoenician glass head bead

Carthaginian. c. 5th-4th century BC

Provenance:
Collection of Eberhardt Voigt (1920-1983) Germany, acquired 1960s – early 1970s and thence by descent

Literature:
For the distinctive colouring and style, compare a Carthaginian pendant of slightly later date in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (acc. no. 17.194.735).

Description:
Rod-formed, the face is of yellow opaque glass above a square blue beard, with circular blue and white eyes, yellow lips, and a twisted band of blue glass across the forehead indicating the hair, a small ridged suspension loop above.

Height: 3.2 cm

  - Prehistoric flint hammer stone

Prehistoric flint hammer stone

3500 - 800 BC

Provenance:
Collection of Professor Sir Lucas White King (1856-1925), Dublin and London; Richardson Collection, UK
Bearing original collection label stating: 'Neolithic Hammer or Quern Stone. Ex County Down Ireland, from Prof Sir Lucas White King's Collection'

Literature:
A similar example was found in Norfolk and recorded by the Portable Antiquities Scheme.

Description:
A regularly shaped spherical hammerstone, the surface covered with fine percussion scars.

Diameter: 7 cm

  - Late Roman clear glass cup

Late Roman clear glass cup

c. 4th - 5th century AD

Provenance:
Niemeijer-Huysse Collection, Netherlands, purchased from Schulman, Amsterdam, in 1977

Literature:

Description:
Formed of fine pale green transparent glass, the globular body decorated with a single line of trailing below a flaring rim. Set on a short flaring foot.

Height: 8.3 cm

  - Hellenistic bronze stool

Hellenistic bronze stool

c. 4th-3rd century BC

Provenance:
UK collection acquired 1970s to 1990s; Property of a Private Foundation, acquired from the above 2003

Literature:
A silver diphros of very similar design was found inside the 4th-century BC Macedonian tomb Agios Athanasios I at Stavroupolis, Thessaloniki (Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki, inv. no. ΜΘ 7440); see D. Andrianou, 'The Furniture and Furnishings of Ancient Greek Houses and Tombs', Cambridge, 2009, pp. 28-29, no. 6 and p. 158, n. 20 for further discussion and parallels. We can also compare the stool shown on the 4th century BC stele of Polyxena in Athens (National Museum, inv. no. 723) where the tops of the turned legs clearly protrude above the seat, a feature seemingly intended to keep the cushion in place; see G. M. A. Richter, 'The Furniture of the Greeks, Etruscans, and Romans', London, 1966, pp. 40-41.
For evidence of possible Near Eastern influence see H. Kyrieleis, 'Throne und Klinen: Studien zur Formgeschichte altorientalischer und griechischer Sitz- und Liegemobel vorhellenistischer Zeit' (Berlin, 1969), 40-41

Description:
Of rectangular form, with four cylindrical legs tapering to a circular profiled foot, each decorated with three turned bands, the tops of the legs protruding above the seat frame to form four circular bosses, a horizontal stretcher across the two short sides, also with a central turned band, each terminating at the leg in two curved attachment plates with chequered border, a rectangular space for the insertion of a woven seat.

Four-legged stools - or diphroi - of this type are known from numerous representations on Greek vases and reliefs and are also well-described in the ancient literature. A number of metal examples in silver and iron have been excavated from Hellenistic and Roman period tombs in Macedonia and Thrace, where they formed part of the funerary furniture buried with the dead; these diphroi were often used to support a vessel containing the ashes of the deceased or else for the placement of smaller offerings within the tomb.

The size of this example suggests it may have been used as a foot-stool, perhaps specifically for mounting and dismounting a horse. Domestic Greek stools were typically made of wood, sometimes with solid metal feet. Solid metal stools are unusual, suggesting ceremonial or perhaps royal use. It also points to Near Eastern influence.

Height: 35.9 cm Width: 29.5 cm Depth: 20.5 cm

  - Egyptian woven basket containing three desiccated fruits of the Dom palm

Egyptian woven basket containing three desiccated fruits of the Dom palm

New Kingdom. 18th-20th Dynasty, 1540-1069 BC

Provenance:
Gatineau collection, France, acquired prior 1903; with Charles Ede, London, 2004; with Rupert Wace Ancient Art, London, 2008; Property of a Private Foundation

Literature:
Another basket of fruits found in a tomb-chapel in the Theban Necropolis commemorating Nebamun (c. 1350 BC), a middle-ranking official scribe and grain counter is now in the collection of the British Museum (acc. no. EA5395). See also S. Schoske, B. Kreissl, R. Germer, 'Anch, Blumen für das Leben: Pflanzen im alten Ägypten', Munich, 1992, p. 235, no. 167. On the use of dom-palm fruit in pharaonic Egypt, see M. A. Murray, 'Fruits, Vegetables, Pulses and Condiments' in P. T. Nicholson and I. Shaw, 'Ancient Egyptian Materials and Technology', Cambridge, 2000, pp. 620-621.

Description:
The elliptical basket is constructed of coiled palm fibres woven together with a decorative striped pattern, and contains three desiccated dom palm fruits.

Baskets filled with the preserved fruit of the dom palm have been recovered from a number of different sites in Egypt, including eight discovered in the tomb of Tutankhamun.

The Egyptians often used the fruit to spice their cakes, giving them a gingerbread flavour.

Length: 29.2 cm; width: 17.5 cm

  - Anatolian pottery vessel

Anatolian pottery vessel

Hacilar Region, Middle Chalcolithic, c. 5000 BC

Provenance:
Collection of Elsa Bloch-Diener, Bern, acquired 1970s

Literature:
For the shape, compare a similar vessel sold Christie’s, New York, 11 December 2003, lot 95 (price realised $23,900). See also an example in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (accession number 64.286.5).

Description:
Of biconical form, with slightly pointed shoulders, straight cylindrical neck and circular rim. Painted on the neck and shoulders in burnished red with bold zigzagging stripes and triangles, the rounded base left bare.

Condition:
Two cracks from rim to mid belly secured and filled. Small area of restoration to rim.

This comes with a thermoluminescence test report from Oxford Authentication confirming its antiquity.

Hacilar was a prehistoric settlement in Southwest Turkey, the earliest periods of occupation dating to the early 8th millennium BC. Excavation of this important site took place in the late 1950s under the direction of James Mellaart, the eminent British archaeologist responsible for the discovery of Çatalhöyük. His work at the site revealed similar decoration in the houses to that seen on these characteristic vessels; geometric patterns in red, often burnished, paint on a cream slip.

Height: 15 cm

  - A group of five Anatolian terracotta bulls

A group of five Anatolian terracotta bulls

3rd millennium BC

Provenance:
Private collection Switzerland, acquired 1980s-1990s

Literature:

Description:
Of simple, stylised form, with white slip over all. Each bull with heavy-set body, short splayed legs, and stumpy tail, the broad triangular head with blunt, downwards facing muzzle and thick outsplayed horns demarcated from the face with two incised lines, two round depressions for the eyes and a third for the mouth.

Terracotta figurines of bulls and humped zebu have been unearthed across Anatolia and into the Indus Valley, all with typically stylised, simplified form, squat legs and large horns. Their function is not known, though some are pierced through the neck or hump, suggesting they may have been fitted to model carts, perhaps serving as toys or else as votives.

With a thermoluminescence test report from Oxford Authentication confirming antiquity.

Largest measuring 10.8 cm x 17.2 cm

  - Hellenistic terracotta head of a female

Hellenistic terracotta head of a female

c. 3rd-2nd century BC

Provenance:
Private collection France

Literature:

Description:
Mould-made from a red-brown terracotta, the head with a tang for fitting into the body. The tang follows the line of the long neck and suggests a slightly static pose to the figure with the head facing the viewer. She wears a kerchief wrapped around her head with eye-slits in case the wearer wishes to draw it over her face. The face is fully revealed but the potential to modestly veil oneself is implied. An old collector's number is inscribed in black ink on the neck - '2376'.

The style and material suggest that this head comes from North-west Asia Minor, possibly Smyrna on the Aegean coast of Anatolia.

Height: 6.2 cm

  - Near Eastern bronze plaque of the Master of Animals

Near Eastern bronze plaque of the Master of Animals

Luristan. c. 700 BC

Provenance:
Private collection, USA acquired 1990s

Literature:
A cheekpiece from a horse bit depicting a similar subject in the Nasli M Heeramaneck Collection of Ancient Near Eastern and Central Asian Art now on display at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

Description:
Diameter: 6.5 cm

The circular bronze disc decorated in low relief with the Master of the Animals standing in the centre holding an ibex by a rear leg in each hand. The hero is depicted with a long pointed beard and large round eyes. He wears a long belted tunic and thick boots. A repousse beaded border around the edge of the plaque.

Some small losses around the outer border and a small hole above his right foot filled.

  - Amlash terracotta steatopygous female figure

Amlash terracotta steatopygous female figure

Early 1st millennium BC

Provenance:
European private collection, UK and Switzerland, formed in the 1970s and 1980s; Private collection, Switzerland, acquired 2003

Literature:
Comparable examples were included in the Barcelona exhibition of Mediterranean female images from Prehistoric times to the Roman Period, see the catalogue, 'Deesses Diosas Goddesses', 2000, nos. 80 and 81.

Description:
Height: 33 cm

The stylised figure standing with arms folded in beneath the diminutive breasts, the elongated body with grooved spine, exaggerated hips and protruding buttocks tapering to narrow legs. The bulbous head with double pierced ears and tall headdress.

Amlash refers to sites in the province of Gilan, Iran along the Caspian Sea. The culture is renowned for its distinctive ceramic figures and animals.

This comes with a thermoluminescence test report from Oxford Authentication confirming its antiquity.

  - N/A

N/A

Provenance:

Literature:

Description:

  - Interior of the Temple of Rameses II, Abu Simbel

Interior of the Temple of Rameses II, Abu Simbel

English School. 19th century

Thomas D Bland

Provenance:

Literature:

Description:
Executed in pen and ink and watercolour, heightened with bodycolour and gum arabic, the study shows two figures, a local guide leading a 19th century tourist through the temple by torchlight.

Inscribed with title 'Interior of the Remeses II Temple - Aboo Simbnel' (lower left) and signed and dated 'T D Bland Jan 7th 68' (on the body of the colossal statue of Ramesses as Osiris).

Probably the most renowned of the numerous monuments moved as a result of the threat of flooding from the building of the Aswan High Dam. Between 1964 and 1968 the entire site of Abu Simbel was carefully dismantled to be reassembled 65 metres higher and 200 metres back from the river, now Lake Nasser.

Framed dimensions: 47 x 54 cm

  - Patera handle in the form of a naked youth

Patera handle in the form of a naked youth

Greek. 5th century BC

Provenance:
Private collection, UK, acquired prior to 1970

Literature:
For a complete patera with similar handle see David Gordon Mitten, Suzannah F. Doeringer, 'Master Bronzes from the Classical World' (Cambridge, 1967) pp. 82-83, no. 76. Also Wilhelm Hornbostel et al, 'Aus Gräben und Heiligtümern - Die Antikensammlung Walter Kropatscheck' (Mainz, 1980) pp. 161-164 and 'Master Bronzes from the Classical World', Exhibition catalogue at the Fogg Art Museum, USA, 1968, no. 76.

Height: 17 cm

Description:
The handle in the form of a nude Kouros, hands raised to touch the elaborate palmette which sits atop the boy's head. His face is framed by a thick fringe, his hair held by a band falls down his back in serpentine waves. The figure stands with legs held close together, broken at mid shin. A palmette shaped fixing plate projects back with two holes for rivets to attach to the broad shallow dish which would have been used for libations.

  - Roman Glass Flask

Roman Glass Flask

Eastern Mediterranean. c.3rd-4th century AD

Provenance:
Private collection France, acquired c. 1990

Literature:

Description:
The lenticular body of translucent pale green glass with a cylindrical neck, a pronounce depression at the join, and thick flared rim. Two turquoise ribbon-like trails applied to the sides and continuing up to form handles of circular cross section attached at the middle of the neck. A small flat base with pontil mark.

Height: 14.8 cm

  - Study of Philae

Study of Philae

English School. 19th century

Provenance:

Literature:

Description:
Study from the sketchbook, 'Sketches in the East', of 'J.D.T', an as yet unidentified English watercolour artist. The temple complex of Philae is shown from the Nile, the Kiosk of Trajan standing prominently on the banks of the island.

Along with Abu Simbel, this is one of the most renowned of the numerous monuments moved as a result of the threat of flooding caused by the construction of the Aswan High Dam. Formerly standing on an island in the First Cataract of the Nile, the temple complex was partially flooded for half a century after the building of the Aswan Low Dam. It was moved to the nearby island of Agilkia as part of the UNESCO project.

Titled 'Philae' and dated '25 Dec 1861', bottom left corner.

Dimensions: 24.8 x 37.5 cm
Framed Dimensions: 41 x 53 cm

  - A 19th century Grand Tourist exploring the sites

A 19th century Grand Tourist exploring the sites

English School. 19th century

Provenance:

Literature:

Description:
A cave like interior lit by a candle held by a naked male figure crouched on the heaped bodies of bandaged mummies. A European male looks on whilst a foot is wrested from one of the corpses.
Inscibed on the mount ‘Descent into the Mummy-Pits, nr. Medeenet Aboo./ My guide is represented trying to break off a/ “nice foot”(!) as a memento of this fascinating/ spot.’

Pencil, pen and ink and wash.

Dimensions of study: 12.5 x 24.5 cm. Framed size: 31.2 x 41 cm

  - Watercolour study of 'Philae'

Watercolour study of 'Philae'

English School. 19th century

Provenance:

Literature:

Description:
Study from the sketchbook, 'Sketches in the East', of 'J.D.T', an as yet unidentified English watercolour artist. A view of the temple of Hathor, Philae.

Along with Abu Simbel, this is one of the most renowned of the numerous monuments moved as a result of the threat of flooding caused by the construction of the Aswan High Dam. Formerly standing on an island in the First Cataract of the Nile, the temple complex was partially flooded for half a century after the building of the Aswan Low Dam. It was moved to the nearby island of Agilkia as part of the UNESCO project.

Titled 'Philae' and dated '29 Dec 1861', bottom left corner.

Dimensions: 24.7 x 36.3 cm
Framed Dimensions: 41.5 x 53 cm

  - Egyptian basalt cosmetic vessel

Egyptian basalt cosmetic vessel

Middle Kingdom. 12th Dynasty, 1980-1801 BC

Provenance:
Private collection of Albert Davis, Arizona, USA, acquired between 1970-1

Literature:
For similarly shaped vessels of varying material see Sir W. M. Flinders Petrie, 'The Funeral Furniture of Egypt. Stone and Metal Vases', reprinted Warminster, 1977, Plate XII. For an example in a Swiss private collection see Madeleine Page-Gasser and Andre Weise, with Thomas Schneider and Sylvia Winterhalter, 'Égypte, Moments d'éternité. Art égyptien dans les collections privées, Suisse' (Mainz, 1998) no. 47. For a discussion on such vessels see Lise Manniche, 'Sacred Luxuries - Fragrance, Aromatherapy and Cosmetics in Ancient Egypt' (New York, 1999) p. 109-110.

Description:
The polished concave sides of the narrow vessel flare from a flat base to a projecting rim.
This type of cylinder vessel would have been used to store cosmetics or precious oils.

Height: 5.5 cm

  - Egyptian faience amulet of Thoth

Egyptian faience amulet of Thoth

Late Dynastic Period. 25th-31st Dynasty, 715-332 BC

Provenance:
Private collection, Normandy, France acquired 1960s

Literature:

Description:
The god of wisdom and writing is portrayed in his ibis-headed manifestation. He stands on a thin integral rectangular base, the body and legs appearing from the back pillar which is pierced through for suspension. His left leg advances, his clenched hands held close to his hips, wearing a short pleated kilt and wig, the lappets falling over his shoulder.

Height: 5.5 cm

  - Pencil and watercolour study of Karnak

Pencil and watercolour study of Karnak

English School. 19th century

Provenance:

Literature:

Description:
Study from the sketchbook, 'Sketches in the East', of 'J.D.T', an as yet unidentified English watercolour artist. A view from the back of the complex of Karnak, the largest ancient religious site in the world. Construction of the temples began in the Middle Kingdom and continued through to the Ptolemaic period.

Titled 'Karnak' and dated '25 January 1862' bottom left corner.

Dimensions: 36.5 x 24.8 cm
Framed Dimensions: 53 x 41.5 cm

  - Roman marble portrait head of a man

Roman marble portrait head of a man

Mid 3rd century AD

Provenance:
Collection of Kenneth J. Lane, USA; Sold at Sotheby's New York, 22 November 1974, lot 320; Private collection, California, USA, acquired 1970s

Literature:

Description:
The handsome sitter looks out at the viewer, his gaze slightly to the left, his expression serious. His eyes deep-set below a furrowed brow, the pupils and irises articulated. Details of his close cropped hair and neat beard are incised. The style of the beard and hair, the coiffure following the shape of the skull, as well as the treatment of the eyes, are typical of portraiture of the mid 3rd Century AD.

The last Emperor of the Severan Dynasty, Marcus Aurelius Severus Alexander (208-235 AD) adopted son of Caracalla, succeeded his cousin Elagabalus upon his assassination in 222 AD. He was himself assassinated in 235. Though seemingly older than his years, this portrait bears a marked resemblance to the images of the young emperor found in the collections of the Uffizi and the Louvre. That he was sometimes depicted as an older statesman is clear from the full length statue in the Museo Nazionale, Naples.

Height: 24.1 cm

  - Hellenistic bronze statuette of the god Attis

Hellenistic bronze statuette of the god Attis

1st century BC-1st century AD

Provenance:
Private collection UK, acquired prior to 1970

Literature:

Description:
Cast solid, the figure stands with his weight on his left leg in a triumphant posture, left arm raised and possibly holding a spear (now missing), his extended right hand would have held a phiale. He wears a Phrygian cap, a short belted tunic and boots (embades) made of fur. His handsome features and particular wavy hairstyle reveal the influence of the imagery of Alexander the Great.

The Phrygian god Attis, in Greek mythology the consort of Cybele, represents the fruits of the earth.

Height: 16.1 cm

  - Watercolour study of an Egyptian Temple

Watercolour study of an Egyptian Temple

English School. Early 20th century

Winifred Mabel Brunton (1880-1952)

Provenance:

Literature:

Description:
Watercolour on paper of a colossal seated figure flanking the entrance from the peristyle courtyard into the hypostyle hall of the temple.

Signed with initials 'WMNB' (Winifred Mabel Newberry Brunton) and dated '1912' on the rock in the foreground.

Winifred Brunton (1880-1959) was the South African wife of British Egyptologist Guy Brunton, who excavated at Lahun with Flinders Petrie, later serving as Assistant Keeper of the Cairo Museum. Winifred illustrated many of the finds for her husband's excavation reports and was responsible for the 'portraits' which fill the two volumes, 'Kings and Queens of Ancient Egypt' (1926) and 'Great Ones of Ancient Egypt' (1929). Today these books are highly collectible for the illustrations.

Dimensions: 36 x 27 cm. Framed dimensions: 50.5 x 40.2 cm

  - Watercolour study of Edfu

Watercolour study of Edfu

English School. 19th century

Provenance:

Literature:

Description:
Study from the sketchbook, 'Sketches in the East', of 'J.D.T', an as yet unidentified English watercolour artist. A view of the main entrance, the first pylon of the temple of Edfu, one of the best preserved in Egypt, constructed in the Ptolemaic period and dedicated to Horus.

Titled 'Edfoo' and dated '20 Dec 1861', bottom left corner.

Dimensions: 36.2 x 24.5 cm
Framed Dimensions: 52.7 x 41.5 cm

  - Group of 3 neolithic flint tools, found in the Netherlands

Group of 3 neolithic flint tools, found in the Netherlands

c. 3rd millenium BC

Provenance:
Found in Aamsven, The Netherlands in October 1958 by David Bakker.
Private collection of David Bakker and thence by descent to his great grandson Ben Edelenbos; Private collection, The Netherlands acquired from Mr Edelenbos in 2012

Literature:

Description:
The group includes an example of each of the classic forms of prehistoric flint tool. A finely knapped dagger with sharply pointed, leaf-shaped blade; a thick butted hand axe of attractive grey marbled flint and a small, complete arrow head. Though found in Aamsveen in the east of the Netherlands close to the border with Germany, their origins are more likely to have been in Denmark from where many of the finest ancient stone tools hailed. The spread of such finds reveals an active trade in such objects during the neolithic period.

A finely knapped dagger of dark grey/black flint, the leaf-shaped blade sharply pointed, with fine stitching around the edges. The butt or grip an extension of the blade, straight sided with diamond shaped profile.

Dagger length: 18.2 cm; Axe: 14.5 cm; Arrow head: 4.5 cm

  - Study of a tomb at Beni Hasan

Study of a tomb at Beni Hasan

English School. 19th century

Rev. John Louis Petit (1801–1868)

Provenance:

Literature:

Description:
A study executed in a striking palette of reds and terracottas over pencil by the Rev. John Louis Petit (1801–1868) of the interior of the 12th Dynasty rock cut tomb of Baqet III at Beni Hasan (tomb 15). This tomb is renowned for its depictions of wrestling techniques, a part of these scenes visible on the rear wall surrounding the niche.

Born in Ashton under Lyne, Lancashire and educated at Eton and Cambridge, the Rev Petit was an accomplished artist publishing a number of books on church architecture. He sketched rapidly and always painted 'plein air', finishing his drawings on site. In 1864-5 he travelled extensively in the East returning home with a collection of studies which included this fine example.

Inscribed on the back in blue ink '1864-5, 32' and in pencil, 'Beni Hasssan 6th January 1865'.

Dimensions: 39.5 x 28 cm
Framed Dimensions: 46.5 x 58.4 cm